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A Guide to Uncontested Divorce August 1, 2019

Colchester, New London
A Guide to Uncontested Divorce , Colchester, Connecticut

Spouses who are seeking a quicker and more affordable way to end their marriage may consider filing an uncontested divorce. This can also help ease the emotional and financial burden of the situation. Connecticut family law offers this option to couples who are able to agree on the terms of their divorce without going through litigation. The following guide provides further insight into the basics of uncontested divorce. 

What to Know About Uncontested Divorce in Connecticut 

What Is an Uncontested Divorce? 

An uncontested divorce occurs when two spouses both wish to terminate their union and can generally agree upon the division of marital property and debts, child custody and visitation, alimony, and child support. After arriving at a settlement agreement, it must be presented to the court for approval before the divorce can be granted.  

What Are the Benefits?

Choosing an uncontested divorce comes with several benefits. First, it allows for more privacy, as the court proceedings of a contested divorce are a matter of public record. In an uncontested divorce, the details of the settlement can be kept between the couple, their attorneys, and the judge. Second, it can save quite a bit of time. Spouses who are willing to negotiate amicably can generally come to agreeable terms much faster than it takes to complete a traditional divorce in family law court. Finally, uncontested divorces are typically less expensive than contested ones, since the latter can involve hefty court fees.

Is It Necessary to Hire an Attorney? 

family-lawPursuing an uncontested divorce doesn’t always mean spouses will be able to reach an agreement on every single issue that arises. A family law attorney can help with negotiations and offer an objective viewpoint to ensure a fair and reasonable settlement is made. They will also assist with filing all the complex paperwork required by the court. 

When an Uncontested Divorce Isn’t a Good Idea

An uncontested divorce usually isn’t an effective option for those with particularly complicated cases or serious disagreements. If one spouse seems to have more financial or emotional power over the other, this can create challenges in the negotiation process. Also, anyone in a relationship who as experienced domestic violence will not likely find an uncontested divorce favorable.

 

 

If you have made the difficult decision to end your marriage, Gilbert P. Kaback, Attorney at Law in Colchester, CT, can help determine if an uncontested divorce is in your best interest. With more than two decades of legal experience and extensive knowledge of Connecticut family law, he has successfully guided numerous residents of New London County through the divorce process. Whether your case is negotiated or litigated, he will fight to ensure you receive the settlement you’re entitled to. Call (860) 537-0874 to arrange a consultation, or visit him online for more information on his services. 

 

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