Perry, Georgia
633 General Courtney Hodges Blvd.
Perry, GA 31069
478-224-7387

Pet Care Professionals Answer FAQ About Flea Treatment July 26, 2018

Perry, Houston
Pet Care Professionals Answer FAQ About Flea Treatment , Perry, Georgia

Fleas are in some ways the ultimate pest: they feast on not only people but also their pets, are extremely small and thus hard to kill, and are constantly spawning. People who own cats or dogs need to be especially vigilant about keeping fleas at bay. Perry Animal Hospital, a team of pet care professionals in Georgia, answers a few FAQ about fleas and treatments. 

Common Questions About Fleas

What Kind of Environment Do Fleas Live In?

Fleas love humidity, and they enjoy longer life spans in those conditions. In hotter environments, most freshly hatched fleas can live for two months or longer without attaching to a host. In colder climates, on the other hand, fleas can't survive more than a couple weeks without zeroing in on a host. 

Do Fleas Pose a Major Health Threat?

pet careAmong pets, if left undisturbed fleas can cause skin rashes and irritations, and occasionally transmit other parasites, including tapeworm. In the worst-case scenario, fleas can suck so much blood that their presence can become fatal—an outcome far more likely among puppies and kittens. Signs of flea bites on your cat or dog can include scabs, irritated skin, loss of fur, and incessant scratching. 

How Long Does It Take Fleas to Lay Eggs?

Female fleas can begin spawning soon after feeding—specifically, within a day or so. Once the female is attached to a host from which she can draw a consistent supply of blood, she may lay up to 50 eggs a day. 

Can I Handle Flea Infestations on My Own?

Probably not. Even if pet owners know exactly how to spot fleas and think they've eradicated the pests on their pets, there's still the issue of hatchlings. Flea eggs are much harder to find and may be far more numerous than the adult fleas burrowed in your pet's fur. To completely eliminate the infestation, reach out to a pet care professional. Preventative measures include investing in a flea comb and using advanced flea treatments, many of which are only available through your local vet. 

Residents of Georgia that think their animal has a flea problem or any other health issue should stop by the Perry Animal Hospital. The clinic's rigorous vaccination programs can ensure that your pets all have the right treatments against fleas, ticks, and viruses like rabies. In addition to routine vaccines and pet exams, Perry Animal Hospital also offers more sophisticated pet care, including medical procedures like laser surgery and pet microchip identification. They also accept CareCredit®. Visit the veterinary clinic's website to learn more or call directly at (478) 224-7387. 

Other Announcements, Events and Deals from Perry Animal Hospital
What to Know About Hematomas in Dogs, Perry, Georgia
A hematoma is an area where blood has pooled due to broken blood vessels. This type of injury is common in dogs, and can cause them serious pain and discomfort without the correct pe...read more
February is National Pet Dental Month, Perry, Georgia
Did you know that almost 100% of dogs and cats have significant dental disease, including plaque, calculus (tartar) gingivitis/periodontal disease and infected tooth roots that can d...read more
How to Cat-Proof Your Christmas Tree, Perry, Georgia
Now that the holiday season is upon us, it’s time to deck the halls, hang the stockings, and decorate the Christmas tree. Unfortunately, if you’re a cat owner, it’s also time to exer...read more
5 Holiday Plants Pet Parents Should Avoid , Perry, Georgia
When winter weather keeps you from going outdoors, bringing nature indoors helps keep your spirits up and gives your home a touch of holiday warmth. Unfortunately, many popular holid...read more
What You Should Know This National Pet Obesity Awareness Day, Perry, Georgia
Knowing if your pet is at a healthy weight isn’t always obvious. In fact, many may be surprised to learn that more than half of American cats and dogs are overweight. That’s why the ...read more